Gwinnett County Police Department a simple thanks for professionalism .. goes viral

On November 29, 2015 in Gwinnett County, Ga. Zanub Rizvi had a motor vehicle accident and Officers from the Gwinnett County Police Department arrived on the scene to do their duty. It is how they treated Zanub Rizvi and her mother in law who are Muslim’s that is getting some viral attention.

Both women were on their way to a religious service and “I was in a Pakistani suit, and my MIL in full Islamic headscarf,” Rizvi’ explained.

The first officer on the scene asked if the two women were alright, however Rizvi’s mother in law had some pain in her neck and she explained that to the officer. The officer understood that because the women were culturally different that he needed to respect their religion and yet still wanted to help.

He proceeded methodically and explained while questioning. Rizvi said the policeman looked at the older woman and said, “I don’t want to be disrespectful, ma’am is it OK if I check your neck?” “He was so worried he might offend us,” Rizvi wrote. “I translate for my MIL and she lifts her scarf so that the cop can check her neck.”

Cpl. Michele Pihera, who is a spokeswoman for the Department said “People who request services from the Gwinnett County Police Department can expect our officers to handle a situation impartially and with empathy, no matter their personal circumstances,” Pihera wrote in an email. She quoted the agency’s mission statement, which calls for service to the community in an “unbiased and compassionate manner.”

The reason that Rizvi shared this small event and it gathered so much attention is simple she stated: ”I was pleasantly surprised with the cultural sensitivity and courtesy shown by everyone, especially being in the Deep South,” Rizvi wrote. “Just thought that with all the hate being spread in the news, I’d share something nice.”

 

The original post by Zanub Rizvi read as follows:

Today I got rear-ended while trying to make a left turn. We live an hour outside Atlanta, Georgia. All the cops and paramedics who responded were white males. Me, my daughter and my mother-in-law were on our way to a religious gathering. I was in a Pakistani suit, and my MIL in full Islamic headscarf. It’s obvious we are a Muslim family. First cop to arrive asks if we are ok, and I tell him my MIL has neck pain. I open the car door and he sees my MIL in hijab. He says “I don’t want to be disrespectful, Ma’am is it OK if I check your neck? (turning to me) I don’t want to be disrespectful” He was so worried he might offend us. I translated for my MIL and she lifts her scarf so the cop can check her neck. The paramedics that arrived several minutes later were equally gentle. I was pleasantly surprised with the cultural sensitivity and courtesy shown by everyone, especially being in the Deep South.

Just thought that with all the hate being spread in the news, I’d share something nice.

This was what Zanub Rizvi had posted originally that got over 90,000 likes and shares.

CVcrhNyWEAEddWu.png large

 

 

 

Indeed it seems that media is more interested in showing the negative side of what officers do rather than all the good that goes on everyday across our nation.Officers themselves are reluctant to share these stories because they do it out of the kindness of their hearts not looking for recognition but rather just because they want to do something nice or because it is the right thing to do.

Officers see so much bad everyday that they become compelled to help others when they can to ease human suffering. However they hardly ever talk about it. Hearing these stories and finding out about them becomes a monumental task since the Officers themselves never tell anyone what they have done.

It is normally the victims who have been helped that tell someone and hopefully media outlets report on it, but it never makes news. It is only through social media that these events gather the attention that the negative stories do.

If you have a story that you want to share about an officer doing something good please don’t hesitate to report it to the WideBlueLine@Gmail.com, Connect with us on Facebook , Twitter or fill out the following form to let us know about the story you would like to see shared.

Help make the Blue Line grow wider!

 

wbl2

Leave a Reply